Students walk-out, call for gun control

Students+walk+the+track+in+support+of+gun+control+reform+as+a+part+of+the+%22walk-out%22+movement%2C+which+aims+to+bolster+support+for+gun+control.+More+than+two-hundred+students+circled+the+track+starting+at+noon+on+Feb.+21.
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Students walk-out, call for gun control

Students walk the track in support of gun control reform as a part of the

Students walk the track in support of gun control reform as a part of the "walk-out" movement, which aims to bolster support for gun control. More than two-hundred students circled the track starting at noon on Feb. 21.

Alan Imar

Students walk the track in support of gun control reform as a part of the "walk-out" movement, which aims to bolster support for gun control. More than two-hundred students circled the track starting at noon on Feb. 21.

Alan Imar

Alan Imar

Students walk the track in support of gun control reform as a part of the "walk-out" movement, which aims to bolster support for gun control. More than two-hundred students circled the track starting at noon on Feb. 21.

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Students at nearly 50 schools around South Florida walked out of school midday to protest gun violence and bolster support for gun control.

In solidarity with the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., more than 200 students took to the track at noon on Feb. 21 to show support for Douglas students and call for legal reform.

Assistant Principals Humberto Brito and Pamela Clappier, along with other administrators and faculty, stood by exit doors in Building Two to ensure students did not leave school grounds. Students were instead directed to the back field to march.

While waking, students chanted phrases like “No justice, no peace,” “Hey hey NRA, how many kids have you killed today” and “What do we want? Gun control! When do we want it? Now!”

Rocco, a junior who requested that his last name not be published, was at the track to defend his anti-gun control stance. His family is from Cuba, and he bases his Second Amendment position on the idea that the government might infringe on citizens’ rights. Gun ownership will prevent a powerful government, according to his logic.

“We need to keep our guns because if the government became corrupt, we would be able to defend ourselves,” he said.

Rocco thought students were using the march as an excuse to skip class. It was unclear who students’ passionate calls for change were directed at. Local and national news networks did not cover Krop’s walk-out.

At around 12:40 p.m., the students moved to the hallways in Building Two, loudly chanting “No justice, no peace!” Brito and other staff calmed the commotion and directed students back to class.