Munzenberger’s Mole Day

Students+show+Munzenberger+their+Fairy+Godmole+and+magical+cupcake+project+for+Mole+Day.+

Kevin Bauernfeind

Students show Munzenberger their Fairy Godmole and magical cupcake project for Mole Day.

Tiffany Schram, Staff Writer

“Happy Mole Day!” science teacher Ashley Munzenberger told her chemistry classes on Monday as she celebrated her 3rd annual Mole Day.

According to moleday.org, Mole Day is celebrated annually on October 23 from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m and honors Avogadro’s Number (6.02 x 10^23), which is a basic unit of measure in chemistry. Mole Day was created as a way to bring interest to chemistry and add a little fun to the science. The world celebrates Mole Day with various activities related to chemistry and/or moles.

From posters that say “Happy Moleoween” and “Coca-Mola,” to foods like Caramole Apples and Guacamole, Munzenberger combines fun and learning to engage her students.”

More than one hundred Mole Day projects surround the walls of Munzenberger’s classroom. From posters that say “Happy Moleoween” and “Coca-Mola,” to foods like Caramole Apples and Guacamole, Munzenberger combines fun and learning to engage her students.

“It’s a great way to express my artistic skills and put them into scientific projects,” junior Cameron Davis, who drew a mole dressed as the Terminator, said. He called it the “Termolenator.”

Kevin Bauernfeind
Facundo Archinelli (left), Jonathan Estrada (middle), and Joel Benarroch (right) went all out with their Mole Buster costumes for Mole Day.

Students spent hours on their Mole Day projects, some even days. They came to school dressed up as their projects, such as, Iron Mole (Iron Man), Spider Mole (Spider Man) and Gossip Mole (Gossip Girl). “Happy Mole Day” pins were also given out to students.

Munzenberger is always excited to see her students projects.

“It’s a chemistry fiesta,” Munzenberger said. “Mole Day is a way to show that chemistry is fun, and teach science all at the same time.”